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Vitamin K

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    Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin that is available in two types. The main type is called phylloquinone, discovered in green leafy vegetables like collard greens, kale, and spinach. The other type, menaquinones, are discovered in some animal foods and fermented foods. Menaquinones can also be produced by bacteria in the human body.

    Vitamin K assists to make different proteins that are needed for blood clotting and the building of bones. Prothrombin is a vitamin K-dependent protein straight involved with blood clotting. Osteocalcin is another protein that requires vitamin K to produce healthy bone tissue.

    Vitamin K is found throughout the body including the liver, brain, heart, pancreas, and bone. It is broken down really quickly and excreted in urine or stool. Because of this, it seldom reaches toxic levels in the body even with high consumptions, as might in some cases occur with other fat-soluble vitamins. [1]

    Why do individuals take vitamin K?

    Low levels of vitamin K can raise the danger of uncontrolled bleeding. While vitamin K deficiencies are uncommon in adults, they are very common in newborn infants. A single injection of vitamin K for babies is basic. Vitamin K is also used to neutralize an overdose of the blood thinner Coumadin.

    While vitamin K deficiencies are uncommon, you may be at higher risk if you:.

    Have an illness that impacts absorption in the digestion tract, such as Crohn’s illness or active celiac disease.

    • Take drugs that disrupt vitamin K absorption
    • Are significantly malnourished
    • Drink alcohol heavily
    • In these cases, a healthcare company might suggest vitamin K supplements.

    Uses of vitamin K for cancer, for the symptoms of early morning illness, for the removal of spider veins, and for other conditions are unverified. Discover more about vitamins k2 and d3 as well as which foods load the highest amount. [2]

    Summary

    Vitamin K comes in a variety of various kinds, known as vitamers. Kinds of vitamin K are either phylloquinones (vitamin K1) or menaquinones (vitamin K2). There are different vitamers within the vitamin K2 class, abbreviated as MK-x.

    The minimum efficient dose for phylloquinone (vitamin K1) is 50mcg, which suffices to satisfy the Recommended Daily Consumption (RDI) for vitamin K. The maximum dosage for vitamin K1 is 1,000 mcg.

    The minimum reliable dosage for short chain menaquinones (MK-4) is 1,500 mcg. Doses of as much as 45mg (45,000 mcg) have actually been securely used in a superloading dosing procedure.

    The minimum reliable dose for longer chain menaquinones (MK-7, MK-8, and MK-9) is between 90-360mcg. Further research study is needed to identify the optimum reliable dose for MK-7.

    A topical application of vitamin K should include a minimum of 5% phylloquinone.

    Vitamin K need to be supplemented together with fatty acids, even if the vitamin is coming from a plant-based source, so think about taking vitamin K at meal time. Microwaving plant-based sources of vitamin K will increase the absorption rate of the vitamin. [3]

    Which foods consist of vitamin K?

    Vitamin K is a group of compounds divided into 2 groups– K1 (phylloquinone) and K2 (menaquinone).

    Vitamin K1, the most typical form, is mainly found in plant foods, especially dark leafy greens. K2, on the other hand, is only discovered in animal foods and fermented plant foods, such as natto.

    The following 20 foods are great sources of vitamin K.

    1. Kale (prepared)– 443% of the DV per serving

    1/2 cup: 531 mcg (443% of the DV).

    100 grams: 817 mcg (681% of the DV).

    2. Mustard greens (prepared)– 346% of the DV per serving

    1/2 cup: 415 mcg (346% of the DV).

    100 grams: 593 mcg (494% of the DV).

    3. Swiss chard (raw)– 332% of the DV per serving

    1 leaf: 398 mcg (332% of the DV).

    100 grams: 830 mcg (692% of the DV).

    4. Collard greens (cooked)– 322% of the DV per serving

    1/2 cup: 386 mcg (322% of the DV).

    100 grams: 407 mcg (339% of the DV).

    5. Natto– 261% of the DV per serving

    1 ounce: 313 mcg (261% of the DV).

    100 grams: 1,103 mcg (920% of the DV).

    6. Spinach (raw)– 121% of the DV per serving

    1 cup: 145 mcg (121% of the DV).

    100 grams: 483 mcg (402% of the DV).

    7. Broccoli (cooked)– 92% of the DV per serving

    1/2 cup: 110 mcg (92% of the DV).

    100 grams: 141 mcg (118% of the DV).

    8. Brussels sprouts (cooked)– 91% of the DV per serving

    1/2 cup: 109 mcg (91% of the DV).

    100 grams: 140 mcg (117% of the DV).

    9. Beef liver– 60% of the DV per serving

    1 piece: 72 mcg (60% of the DV).

    100 grams: 106 mcg (88% of the DV).

    10. Pork chops– 49% of the DV per serving

    3 ounces: 59 mcg (49% of the DV).

    100 grams: 69 mcg (57% of the DV).

    11. Chicken– 43% of the DV per serving

    3 ounces: 51 mcg (43% of the DV).

    100 grams: 60 mcg (50% of the DV).

    12. Goose liver paste– 40% of the DV per serving

    1 tablespoon: 48 mcg (40% of the DV).

    100 grams: 369 mcg (308% of the DV).

    13. Green beans (prepared)– 25% of the DV per serving

    1/2 cup: 30 mcg (25% of the DV).

    100 grams: 48 mcg (40% of the DV).

    14. Prunes– 24% of the DV per serving

    5 pieces: 28 mcg (24% of the DV).

    100 grams: 60 mcg (50% of the DV).

    15. Kiwi– 23% of the DV per serving

    1 fruit: 28 mcg (23% of the DV).

    100 grams: 40 mcg (34% of the DV).

    16. Soybean oil– 21% of the DV per serving

    1 tablespoon: 25 mcg (21% of the DV).

    100 grams: 184 mcg (153% of the DV).

    17. Hard cheeses– 20% of the DV per serving

    1 ounce: 25 mcg (20% of the DV).

    100 grams: 87 mcg (72% of the DV).

    18. Avocado– 18% of the DV per serving

    Half of a fruit, medium: 21 mcg (18% of the DV).

    100 grams: 21 mcg (18% of the DV).

    19. Green peas (prepared)– 17% of the DV per serving

    1/2 cup: 21 mcg (17% of the DV).

    100 grams: 26 mcg (22% of the DV).

    20. Soft cheeses– 14% of the DV per serving

    1 ounce: 17 mcg (14% of the DV).

    100 grams: 59 mcg (49% of the DV).

    3 more veggies high in vitamin K

    The best sources of vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) are dark, leafy green vegetables. In fact, the prefix “phyllo” in this vitamin’s name refers to leaves.

    1. Beet greens (prepared)– 290% of the DV per serving

    1/2 cup: 349 mcg (290% of the DV).

    100 grams: 484 mcg (403% of the DV).

    2. Parsley (fresh)– 137% of the DV per serving

    1 sprig: 164 mcg (137% of the DV).

    100 grams: 1,640 mcg (1,367% of the DV).

    3. Cabbage (cooked)– 68% of the DV per serving

    1/2 cup: 82 mcg (68% of the DV).

    100 grams: 109 mcg (91% of the DV).

    6 more meat products high in vitamin K

    Fatty meats and liver are excellent sources of vitamin K2, though the content differs by the animal’s diet plan and may vary between areas or manufacturers. Keep in mind that research on the vitamin K2 material of animal foods is incomplete.

    1. Bacon– 25% of the DV per serving

    3 ounces: 30 mcg (25% of the DV).

    100 grams: 35 mcg (29% of the DV).

    2. Hamburger– 7% of the DV per serving

    3 ounces: 8 mcg (7% of the DV).

    100 grams: 9.4 mcg (8% of the DV).

    3. Pork liver– 6% of the DV per serving

    3 ounces: 6.6 mcg (6% of the DV).

    100 grams: 7.8 mcg (7% of the DV).

    4. Duck breast– 4% of the DV per serving

    3 ounces: 4.7 mcg (4% of the DV).

    100 grams: 5.5 mcg (5% of the DV).

    5. Beef kidneys– 4% of the DV per serving

    3 ounces: 4.9 mcg (4% of the DV).

    100 grams: 5.7 mcg (5% of the DV).

    6. Chicken liver– 3% of the DV per serving

    1 ounce: 3.6 mcg (3% of the DV).

    100 grams: 13 mcg (11% of the DV).

    9 more dairy foods and eggs high in vitamin K

    Dairy foods and eggs are good sources of vitamin K2.

    Like meat, their vitamin material depends on the animal’s diet plan, and specific values may differ by region or producer.

    1. Jarlsberg cheese– 19% of the DV per serving

    1 slice: 22 mcg (19% of the DV).

    100 grams: 80 mcg (66% of the DV).

    2. Soft cheeses– 14% of the DV per serving

    1 ounce: 17 mcg (14% of the DV).

    100 grams: 59 mcg (49% of the DV).

    3. Edam cheese– 11% of the DV per serving

    1 slice: 13 mcg (11% of the DV).

    100 grams: 49 mcg (41% of the DV).

    4. Blue cheese– 9% of the DV per serving

    1 ounce: 10 mcg (9% of the DV).

    100 grams: 36 mcg (30% of the DV).

    5. Egg yolk– 5% of the DV per serving

    1 big: 5.8 mcg (5% of the DV).

    100 grams: 34 mcg (29% of the DV).

    6. Cheddar– 3% of the DV per serving

    1 ounce: 3.7 mcg (3% of the DV).

    100 grams: 13 mcg (11% of the DV).

    7. Entire milk– 3% of the DV per serving

    1 cup: 3.2 mcg (3% of the DV).

    100 grams: 1.3 mcg (1% of the DV).

    8. Butter– 2% of the DV per serving

    1 tablespoon: 3 mcg (2% of the DV).

    100 grams: 21 mcg (18% of the DV).

    9. Cream– 2% of the DV per serving

    2 tablespoons: 2.7 mcg (2% of the DV).

    100 grams: 9 mcg (8% of the DV).

    7 more fruits high in vitamin K

    Fruits usually don’t consist of as much vitamin K1 as leafy green veggies, but a couple of supply good amounts.

    1. Blackberries– 12% of the DV per serving

    1/2 cup: 14 mcg (12% of the DV).

    100 grams: 20 mcg (17% of the DV).

    2. Blueberries– 12% of the DV per serving

    1/2 cup: 14 mcg (12% of the DV).

    100 grams: 19 mcg (16% of the DV).

    3. Pomegranate– 12% of the DV per serving

    1/2 cup: 14 mcg (12% of the DV).

    100 grams: 16 mcg (14% of the DV).

    4. Figs (dried)– 6% of the DV per serving

    5 pieces: 6.6 mcg (6% of the DV).

    100 grams: 16 mcg (13% of the DV).

    5. Tomatoes (sun-dried)– 4% of the DV per serving

    5 pieces: 4.3 mcg (4% of the DV).

    100 grams: 43 mcg (36% of the DV).

    6. Grapes– 3% of the DV per serving

    10 grapes: 3.5 mcg (3% of the DV).

    100 grams: 15 mcg (12% of the DV).

    7. Red currants– 3% of the DV per serving

    1 ounce: 3.1 mcg (3% of the DV).

    100 grams: 11 mcg (9% of the DV).

    8 more nuts and beans high in vitamin K

    Some vegetables and nuts offer decent amounts of vitamin K1 but usually much less than leafy greens.

    1. Soybeans (prepared)– 13% of the DV per serving

    1/2 cup: 16 mcg (13% of the DV).

    100 grams: 33 mcg (28% of the DV).

    2. Sprouted mung beans (prepared)– 12% of the DV per serving

    1/2 cup: 14 mcg (12% of the DV).

    100 grams: 23 mcg (19% of the DV).

    3. Cashews– 8% of the DV per serving

    1 ounce: 9.7 mcg (8% of the DV).

    100 grams: 34 mcg (28% of the DV).

    4. Red kidney beans (prepared)– 6% of the DV per serving

    1/2 cup: 7.4 mcg (6% of the DV).

    100 grams: 8.4 mcg (7% of the DV).

    5. Hazelnuts– 3% of the DV per serving

    1 ounce: 4 mcg (3% of the DV).

    100 grams: 14 mcg (12% of the DV).

    6. Pine nuts– 1% of the DV per serving

    10 nuts: 0.9 mcg (1% of the DV).

    100 grams: 54 mcg (45% of the DV).

    7. Pecans– 1% of the DV per serving

    1 ounce: 1 mcg (1% of the DV).

    100 grams: 3.5 mcg (3% of the DV).

    8. Walnuts– 1% of the DV per serving

    1 ounce: 0.8 mcg (1% of the DV).

    100 grams: 2.7 mcg (2% of the DV) [4]

    Chemistry

    Vitamin K and its derivatives include a 2-methyl-1,4- naphthoquinone nucleus with a lipophilic side chain (figure 1). The structure resembles warfarin and other coumarin-like anticoagulants, which operate as vitamin K antagonists. Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) has a phytyl side chain. Vitamin K2 (menaquinone) has several types, each with an isoprenoid side chain, designated MK-4 (or menatetrenone) through MK-13 according to the length of the side chain. The most common form of menaquinone has 4 residues (MK-4).

    Metabolism

    Vitamin K absorption requires undamaged pancreatic and biliary function and fat absorptive mechanisms. Dietary vitamin K is protein-bound and is liberated by the proteolytic action of pancreatic enzymes in the small intestine. Bile salts then solubilize vitamin K into combined micelles for absorption into enterocytes, where it is integrated into chylomicrons, therefore assisting in absorption into the intestinal lymphatics and portal blood circulation for transport to the liver. In the liver it is repackaged into extremely low-density lipoprotein (VLDL). It circulates in small quantities bound to lipoprotein.

    Vitamin K: 5 scientifically proven benefits

    Promotes blood clot

    You probably think about blood cells or platelets when clotting is gone over, however vitamin K is really important to this procedure that keeps you from extreme bleeding at even the tiniest of injuries.

    K plays an essential function in the production of pro-blood clotting proteins called factors II (prothrombin), VII, IX, and X, and anticoagulant (anti-blood clotting) proteins referred to as proteins C, S, and Z.

    But even though this process is necessary, some people thicken too quickly. Some blood-thinning medications, such as warfarin (brand Coumadin), work by annoying the action of vitamin K.

    Because of this, it is incredibly important that individuals on warfarin keep their vitamin K levels steady. That means viewing their vitamin K consumption throughout the time they’re taking warfarin and getting regular blood tests done.

    Avoid osteoporosis and support strong bones

    However wait, isn’t that calcium and vitamin D? That’s the Destiny’s Kid scenario at play. There are really vitamin K-dependent proteins needed for correct bone health.

    This fat-soluble vitamin needs to be present for an enzyme called gamma-glutamyl carboxylase to make the protein osteocalcin work, through a procedure called carboxylation, which is needed for bone development (Beulens, 2013).

    In spite of its crucial function in controling bone metabolism, it’s unclear whether vitamin K can decrease the threat of bone fractures. Previous research has recommended that getting enough vitamin K can assist avoid bone loss and decrease hip fractures in older males and females (Hamidi, 2013).

    Bone health

    And research done specifically on postmenopausal ladies with osteoporosis has revealed possible take advantage of K2 supplementation. However a meta-analysis found that vitamin K might help with bone mineral density in some physical locations, but not others (Fang, 2011; Iwamoto, 2014).

    More work requirements to be done to clarify the relationship and see if supplementing with the Ks might assist prevent fractures, particularly those at the hip.

    May enhance memory in older adults

    Vitamin K-dependent proteins (VKDP) that require the intake of vitamin K to operate correctly don’t simply affect your bone modeling, though.

    The VKDPs not associated with bone development or blood clot are involved with the metabolism of sphingolipids, a class of lipids frequently discovered in brain cell membranes that are involved with cellular events.

    Changes in sphingolipid metabolism have been linked with not only age-related cognitive decline however also neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer’s (Ferland, 2012).

    Current research study recommends that vitamin K antagonists, which are utilized as anticoagulants, may have a negative impact on visual memory, verbal fluency, and brain volume. However it does not appear to go in simply one direction (Alisi, 2019).

    Higher vitamin K levels, particularly phylloquinone (K1), are connected with better spoken episodic memory, though no distinction was observed with non-verbal episodic memory (Presse, 2013).

    Keep blood pressure down

    Getting a sufficient intake of vitamin K may also be essential to your heart health because it may have the ability to assist prevent high blood pressure (abnormally hypertension) and lower your risk of heart disease (more on that in a second).

    Low vitamin D and K status have actually been connected to high blood pressure with boosts in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Like D, vitamin K engages closely with calcium in your body, in this case, helping to regulate the levels of this mineral in your blood (Ballegooijen, 2017).

    Vascular calcification– a process in which minerals like calcium are deposited in capillary, blocking blood circulation with time– prevails as we age. But getting the proper amount of vitamin K may assist prevent mineralization, warding off this process and keeping high blood pressure lower.

    Lower danger of heart problem

    Your danger of a cardiovascular occasion is closely connected with the calcification of your capillary.

    In fact, one meta-analysis that looked at 30 research studies found a 300– 400 percent increase in your threat of cardiovascular occasions with the presence of calcification on any arterial wall (Rennenberg, 2009).

    But greater blood levels of the K1 kind of vitamin K are associated with a lower risk of heart disease. [6]

    What is Vitamin K Shortage Bleeding?

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding or VKDB, happens when babies can not stop bleeding since their blood does not have adequate Vitamin K to form an embolism. The bleeding can occur anywhere on the within or beyond the body. When the bleeding takes place inside the body, it can be difficult to notice. Typically, a child with VKDB will bleed into his/her intestinal tracts, or into the brain, which can cause mental retardation and even death. Infants who do not get the vitamin K chance at birth can develop VKDB at any time up to 6 months of age. There are three types of VKDB, based on the age of the infant when the bleeding problems start: early, classical and late. More info about these types is included listed below.

    Why are children more likely to have vitamin K shortage and to get VKDB?

    All infants, despite sex, race, or ethnic background, are at greater threat for VKDB till they start eating regular foods, normally at age 4-6 months, and until the regular digestive bacteria begin making vitamin K. This is since:

    At birth, babies have really little vitamin K saved in their bodies due to the fact that just small amounts pass to them through the placenta from their mothers.

    The great germs that produce vitamin K are not yet present in the newborn’s intestines.

    Breast milk includes low amounts of vitamin K, so exclusively breastfed children do not get enough vitamin K from the breast milk, alone.

    What can I do to prevent my baby from getting vitamin K shortage and VKDB?

    The good news is that VKDB is easily avoided by providing children a vitamin K shot into a muscle in the thigh. One shot given just after birth will safeguard your baby from VKDB. In order to offer instant bonding and contact in between the newborn and mother, providing the vitamin K shot can be delayed up to 6 hours after birth.

    Is the Vitamin K shot safe?

    Yes. Lots of studies have revealed that vitamin K is safe when provided to newborns. For additional information about the security of the vitamin K shot, please see our FAQ’s.

    What might trigger babies to be lacking in vitamin K and have bleeding issues?

    Some things can put babies at a higher threat for establishing VKDB. Infants at greater risk include:

    1. Children who do not get a vitamin K shot at birth. The threat is even higher if they are exclusively breastfed.
    2. Children whose mothers used specific medications, like isoniazid or medicines to deal with seizures. These drugs interfere with how the body utilizes vitamin K.
    3. Babies who have liver illness; typically they can not use the vitamin K their body shops.
    4. Infants who have diarrhea, celiac disease, or cystic fibrosis typically have difficulty soaking up vitamins, consisting of vitamin K, from the foods they consume.

    How typically are babies impacted with vitamin K shortage bleeding?

    Given that children can be impacted up until they are 6 months old, healthcare providers divide VKDB into three types; early, classical and late. The chart below helps describe these three various types.

    Early and classical VKDB are more common, happening in 1 in 60 to 1 in 250 babies, although the risk is much higher for early VKDB among those babies whose moms used particular medications throughout the pregnancy.

    Late VKDB is rarer, happening in 1 in 14,000 to 1 in 25,000 babies (1– 3).

    Infants who do not receive a vitamin K shot at birth are 81 times most likely to develop late VKDB than babies who do receive a vitamin K shot at birth. [7]

    Reasons For Vitamin K Deficiency

    Vitamin K shortage can arise from the following:

    • Lack of vitamin K in the diet plan
    • An extremely low fat diet because vitamin K is best absorbed when eaten with some fat
    • Conditions that hinder fat absorption and that therefore minimize the absorption of vitamin K (such as obstruction of the bile ducts or cystic fibrosis)
    • Specific drugs, including antiseizure drugs, and some prescription antibiotics
    • Intake of large quantities of mineral oil, which might minimize the absorption of vitamin K

    Newborns are prone to vitamin K shortage because of the following:

    • Just small amounts of vitamin K pass from the mother to the fetus during pregnancy.
    • Throughout the very first few days after birth, the newborn’s intestinal tract has actually not yet obtained bacteria to produce vitamin K.

    Symptoms of Vitamin K Deficiency

    The primary symptom of vitamin K deficiency is bleeding (hemorrhage)– into the skin (causing swellings), from the nose, from a wound, in the stomach, or in the intestinal tract. In some cases bleeding in the stomach causes throwing up with blood. Blood may be seen in the urine or stool, or stools may be tarry black.

    In newborns, lethal bleeding within or around the brain may take place.

    Having a liver disorder increases the threat of bleeding, since clotting aspects are made in the liver.

    Vitamin K deficiency might likewise deteriorate bones.

    Medical Diagnosis of Vitamin K Shortage

    Blood tests

    Medical professionals think vitamin K shortage when unusual bleeding takes place in people with conditions that put them at risk.

    Blood tests to determine how quickly embolism are done to assist verify the medical diagnosis. Knowing how much vitamin K people consume assists doctors interpret results of these blood tests. Sometimes the vitamin K level in the blood is determined.

    Treatment of Vitamin K Deficiency

    A vitamin K injection in the muscle is recommended for all newborns to lower the risk of bleeding within the brain after shipment.

    If vitamin K deficiency is detected, vitamin K is usually taken by mouth or given by injection under the skin. If a drug is the cause, the dose of the drug is adjusted or extra vitamin K is offered. [8]

    Negative effects

    In addition to its needed effects, a medication may trigger some undesirable results. Although not all of these adverse effects might occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

    Check with your medical professional as soon as possible if any of the following side effects take place:.

    Less common

    • Reduced appetite
    • decreased movement or activity
    • difficulty in breathing
    • bigger liver
    • general body swelling
    • irritability
    • muscle tightness
    • paleness
    • yellow eyes or skin

    Unusual

    • Problem in swallowing
    • quickly or irregular breathing
    • lightheadedness or fainting
    • shortness of breath
    • skin rash, hives and/or itching
    • swelling of eyelids, face, or lips
    • tightness in chest
    • struggling breathing and/or wheezing

    Uncommon

    • Blue color or flushing or inflammation of skin
    • dizziness
    • fast and/or weak heart beat
    • increased sweating
    • low high blood pressure (short-lived)

    Some negative effects may happen that generally do not need medical attention. These side effects may disappear during treatment as your body gets used to the medicine. Also, your health care expert might be able to inform you about methods to prevent or reduce some of these negative effects. Contact your healthcare professional if any of the following adverse effects continue or are annoying or if you have any questions about them:.

    • Less typical
    • Flushing of face
    • soreness, pain, or swelling at place of injection
    • skin sores at location of injection (rare)
    • unusual taste

    Opposite effects not listed may likewise take place in some clients. If you discover any other results, check with your healthcare expert. [9]

    Possible Interactions

    If you are presently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not take vitamin K without first talking to your healthcare company.

    Antibiotics– Antibiotics, especially those known as cephalosporins, minimize the absorption of vitamin K in the body. Utilizing them for more than 10 days may lower levels of vitamin K due to the fact that these drugs kill not only damaging germs but likewise the bacteria that make vitamin K. People who already have low levels of vitamin K, such as those who are malnourished, senior, or taking warfarin (Coumadin) are at greater risk. Cephalosporins include:.

    • Cefamandole (Mandol)
    • Cefoperazone (Cefobid)
    • Cefmetazole (Zefazone)
    • Cefotetan (Cefotan)

    Phenytoin (Dilantin)– Phenytoin interferes with the body’s ability to use vitamin K. Taking anticonvulsants (such as phenytoin) during pregnancy or while breastfeeding might decrease vitamin K in babies.

    Warfarin (Coumadin)– Vitamin K obstructs the results of the blood-thinning medication warfarin, so that it does not work. You must not take vitamin K, or consume foods consisting of high amounts of vitamin K, while you are taking warfarin. Talk with your physician for specific dietary standards.

    Orlistat (Xenical, Alli) and Olestra– Orlistat, a medication used for weight loss, and olestra, a compound added to some foods, decreases the amount of fat you body can absorb. Since vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin, these medications might also lower levels of vitamin K. The Fda now requires that vitamin K and other fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, and E) be added to food products consisting of olestra. Physicians who recommend orlistat usually advise taking a multivitamin with these vitamins. If you need to not be taking vitamin K, then you need to avoid foods which contain olestra.

    Cholesterol-lowering medications– Bile acid sequestrants, used to lower cholesterol, decrease how much fat your body soaks up and might likewise lower absorption of fat-soluble vitamins. If you take among these drugs, your physician might recommend a vitamin K supplement:.

    • Cholestyramine (Questran)
    • Colestipol (Colestid)
    • Colsevelam (Welchol) [10]

    Dangers

    No tolerable ceiling has been identified for vitamin K. Toxicity is unusual and unlikely to result from eating foods consisting of vitamin K.

    However, taking any kind of supplement can lead to toxicity.

    Vitamin K can interact with several typical medications, consisting of blood-thinners, anticonvulsants, antibiotics, cholesterol-lowering drugs, and weight-loss drugs.

    Blood thinners, such as warfarin are utilized to prevent damaging blood clots that might block blood circulation to the brain or heart. They work by decreasing or postponing vitamin K’s clotting ability. All of a sudden increasing or reducing vitamin K intake can interfere with the effects of these drugs. Keeping vitamin K consumption consistent from day to day can prevent these issues.

    Anticonvulsants, if taken during pregnancy or while breastfeeding, can increase the threat of vitamin K deficiency in a fetus or a newborn. Examples of anticonvulsants are phenytoin and dilantin.

    Cholesterol-lowering medications hinder fat absorption. Dietary fat is needed for taking in vitamin K, so people who are taking this medication might have a greater threat of deficiency.

    Anyone who is taking any of these medications must speak to their doctor about their vitamin K intake.

    The very best method to make sure the body has adequate nutrients is to take in a balanced diet plan, with plenty of vegetables and fruit. Supplements need to only be used in case of deficiency, and after that, under medical guidance. [11]

    Conclusion

    Vitamins are compounds that your body requires to grow and develop generally. Vitamin K helps your body by making proteins for healthy bones and tissues. It likewise makes proteins for blood clotting. If you don’t have sufficient vitamin K, you might bleed too much.

    Newborns have very little vitamin K. They normally get a shot of vitamin K soon after they are born.

    If you take blood slimmers, you require to be cautious about just how much vitamin K you get. You likewise need to be careful about taking vitamin E supplements. vitamin E can disrupt how vitamin K works in your body. Ask your healthcare provider for suggestions about these vitamins.

    There are different kinds of vitamin K. Most people get vitamin K from plants such as green vegetables, and dark berries. Germs in your intestinal tracts likewise produce percentages of another kind of vitamin K. [12]

    Referrals

    1. https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/vitamin-k/
    2. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins-and-supplements/supplement-guide-vitamin-k
    3. https://examine.com/supplements/vitamin-k/#how-to-take
    4. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/foods-high-in-vitamin-k
    5. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/overview-of-vitamin-k
    6. https://ro.co/health-guide/vitamin-k-benefits/
    7. https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/vitamink/facts.html
    8. https://www.merckmanuals.com/home/disorders-of-nutrition/vitamins/vitamin-k-deficiency
    9. https://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/vitamin-k-class-oral-route-parenteral-route/side-effects/drg-20069592
    10. https://www.mountsinai.org/health-library/supplement/vitamin-k
    11. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/219867#risks
    12. https://medlineplus.gov/vitamink.html

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